Fruits & Vegetables


Depending on the season, you might see the following crops growing in our fields or for sale on our market table: Apples, Arugula, Beets, Blackberries, Blueberries, Broccoli Raab, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbages, Carrots, Collards, Eggplant, Figs, Garlic, Green (or Purple, or Yellow) Bush Beans, Kale, Leeks, Lettuces, Malabar Spinach, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Okra, Onions, Pears, Peppers (sweet and hot varieties), Pink-Eyed Peas, Radishes, Squash (summer and winter varieties), Strawberries, Sugar Snap Peas, Sunchokes, Sweet Potatoes, Swiss Chard, Tatsoi, Tomatoes (slicing, roma, and cherry varieties), Turnips, Zucchini, or maybe something entirely new! 

A little bit more about how and where all those delicious foods are grown...

The formal garden is where it all started at Little Bit Farm. This fenced in area is approximately one acre of gently sloping land adjacent to the barn.  The initial garden included all raised beds.  Untreated cedar and stone were used as the materials for the beds. A variety of fruit trees and berry bushes are scattered around the beds, and berry canes grow along trellises dividing each tier of growing space. A small koi pond sits in the garden center, providing welcome tranquility amidst the bustle of constant farm work. A small chicken coop sits midway down the slope, flanked by two attached runs (our hens have moved on to a pastured life with a mobile coop).  No herbicides, pesticides or synthetic fertilizers are used in the garden, or anywhere else we grow food. Irrigation is provided via overhead spray and drip systems.

 Leeks love cool weather, and so they're one of the first things we plant each year; the tiny transplants arrive in January and gain enough size to harvest around April or May, before the real heat kicks in.

Leeks love cool weather, and so they're one of the first things we plant each year; the tiny transplants arrive in January and gain enough size to harvest around April or May, before the real heat kicks in.

 Malabar Spinach is one of the few greens that will grow in the heat of our southern summers. In addition to providing greens when we'd otherwise be missing them, the Malabar plants produce clusters of little pink flowers toward fall that our bees seem to love, and then those flowers develop into deep purple berries which make an excellent natural dye. 

Malabar Spinach is one of the few greens that will grow in the heat of our southern summers. In addition to providing greens when we'd otherwise be missing them, the Malabar plants produce clusters of little pink flowers toward fall that our bees seem to love, and then those flowers develop into deep purple berries which make an excellent natural dye. 

The garden was expanded in 2012 to allow for row-crop areas.  Initially this expansion was designed to allow the use of a light weight compact utility tractor for cultivation, but we are now in the process of converting these rows in to permanent raised beds as well, to make more complete use of the fenced-in space. 

In 2014, a new field area (where we do most of the growing nowadays) was put under cultivation; this time organized into ninety one 100' rows suitable for tractor work, fenced by 3-strand electric wire, and fully drip-irrigated. This space has allowed us to expand production while maintaining a thorough rotation of our extensive selection of vegetables, and also including season-long cover cropped rest periods. This facilitates regeneration of soil nutrients and helps control pests naturally, without any chemical or synthetic inputs.

 Sunchokes grow in the farthest three rows of our new field, providing a visual border and also attracting our bees (along with other native pollinators) to travel across all of the other rows to reach their tempting yellow blooms, which last most of the summer. This helps assure that all of our other summer crops (tomatoes, beans, melons, squashes, peppers, etc) have the best chance of themselves being fully pollinated. And they produce deliciously crunchy, nutty flavored tubers in the fall!

Sunchokes grow in the farthest three rows of our new field, providing a visual border and also attracting our bees (along with other native pollinators) to travel across all of the other rows to reach their tempting yellow blooms, which last most of the summer. This helps assure that all of our other summer crops (tomatoes, beans, melons, squashes, peppers, etc) have the best chance of themselves being fully pollinated. And they produce deliciously crunchy, nutty flavored tubers in the fall!

 Lines of drip irrigation run down each row, delivering water right where it's needed with very limited evaporation and no run-off due to the slow method of delivery. Here they are easy to see between the lines of newly transplanted Onions which will overwinter in the ground to get a head start in spring. You can also see two rows covered in fallen leaves; this natural mulch helps to protect the soil over just-planted Garlic cloves, which will soon sprout and shoot through their leafy blanket to surpass the onions in size before also going dormant until warm weather returns.

Lines of drip irrigation run down each row, delivering water right where it's needed with very limited evaporation and no run-off due to the slow method of delivery. Here they are easy to see between the lines of newly transplanted Onions which will overwinter in the ground to get a head start in spring. You can also see two rows covered in fallen leaves; this natural mulch helps to protect the soil over just-planted Garlic cloves, which will soon sprout and shoot through their leafy blanket to surpass the onions in size before also going dormant until warm weather returns.